Application screenupdating not working in excel 2016

Microsoft is conducting an online survey to understand your opinion of the Msdn Web site.If you choose to participate, the online survey will be presented to you when you leave the Msdn Web site. By John Walkenbach VBA for Excel 2016 is fast, but it’s not always fast enough.(Computer programs are never fast enough.) Keep reading to discover some programming examples you can use to speed up your macros.Mastering advanced Excel macros has never been easier. Tell the user what's going on and provide an indication of progress, ideally every three to ten seconds.Check out I've written several macro programs that take a while to execute. For example, one program I alone use takes about 40 seconds to execute across 12 similar sheets.The way out of this frozen state is simple: Go back to the VBE, and execute the following statement in the Immediate window: If you have a worksheet with many complex formulas, you may find that you can speed things considerably by setting the calculation mode to manual while your macro is executing.

As you know, a macro can automatically perform a series of actions.The following macro lines will, respectively, turn off screen updating and then turn it back on in a VBA macro.The idea is to use the first line near the beginning of your macro, and then use the second line near the end.For that, I post and update a userform for each step with a text message with the elapsed time, the number and name of each step, and a progress bar. Also, if the program quits, a screen snapshot tells me where the macros quit working on that user's computer. Don't use "Exit Sub", instead use "Go To End Of Macro" and place this code before "End Sub". Screen Updating = True The same goes for all you do with "Application.***" A simple and less involved method of providing progress updates would be to use the following line of code in the macro: Application. Prior to "End Sub", place this last line of code: Application. Screen Updating = False, the statusbar will change.] This does the side effect that it looks as though Excel has "hung" or crashed, especially if the macros is going to take some time to execute.For long macros I would advocate displaying a Userform saying "Please Wait" and for very long macros showing a progress bar or percentage complete, and maybe even a "Cancel" button to exit before completion.

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